SHAWLEIN.COM

The German Shepherd Dog

2016/02/06
by Linda J Shaw
0 comments

Seriously?

This is a VA dog from a recent German Sieger show. In other words, somebody thinks this is a good structured, good moving dog.

Image 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’ve overlaid a skeletal analysis of this dog, showing what his underlying true structure really looks like. Try as I could, I could not make a normal, natural, healthy spine fit into this dog’s body.

Image 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This gait is faster than a walk, but not really a true working trot either. It is certainly not a flying, suspended trot. The dog seems to be pulling into the lead, and is moving at a very slow, supported trot. The near rear foot will fall short of the print of the near forefoot. In a normal supported, working trot, the rear foot will draw even with the forefoot, and land a bit to one side. So it appears this dog is generating very little drive, which is to be expected at such a slow speed.

Image 3

 

Image 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

However, look where the vectors of force, generated by the dog’s rear leg, are being directed. The energy is being driven up through the driving leg, as it should be, up at a rather steep angle through the pelvis, and continues upward through the lumbar vertebrae. It’s not until it reaches the last few vertebrae of the thoracic spine, the midback, that the line of energy is forced forward. Most of it is being blown upward through the mid back. No wonder the dog is prancing with so much energy being wasted upwards, producing a pronounced hunchback, even at a slow, low energy speed. Unfortunately, the thoracic vertebrae then slope dramatically down toward the base of the neck. At no point is this dog’s drive being channeled straight ahead along a straight, strong, level conduit. He is doing the best he can with a distorted spine, and back muscles that are too weak to prevent the trunk from heaving upwards at each drive phase of the stride. Throw a straight spear, and it will remain straight and travel far. Throw a bent spear and it will bend even more with the force of propulsion, and fall short.

Image 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In this phase of his stride, he is not yet fully extended and the pressure on his spine is building. Hence the convex curvature is slightly less, but it is still pronounced, dropping the level of his rear to an abnormal degree. Also, look at the driving hock, excessively flexed because of the lack of clearance. This puts added stress on the one joint that is expected to absorb and direct a huge amount of energy. This dog is nowhere near a normal working speed, and his driving gear appears to be collapsing.

Image 6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In this photo, the dog is showing better speed and extension. The goose stepping is not unusual given his heeling posture. But look at his withers. Despite the degree to which the dog has raised his head, he cannot bring his withers up into alignment. In normal structure, the thoracic vertebrae would rise slightly with the cervical vertebrae of the neck, to keep a smooth, flowing alignment of the neck, withers and back. But this dog shows a steep, abrupt angle where the neck is straining to rise from the withers. The withers, slanted down by the convex curvature of the spine, cannot rise to give the dog free movement of his head and neck.

Trying to redefine the thoracic vertebrae as the “true back”, in the attempt to preserve some illusion that, in dogs like this, the “back” is running level doesn’t change the anatomical reality that this dog’s spine is profoundly distorted and unable to function as a normal canine spine. The pronounced hunching effect that this spine creates drops the rear and forces the dog to run uphill, prancing all the way.

Does anyone seriously think that a dog with this degree of structural distortion could put in a lifetime of hard work, trotting, galloping and jumping? Seriously?

 

The Illustrated Standard for the German Shepherd Dog
The most comprehensive, heavily illustrated breed book ever published. It is a detailed anatomical analysis of the structure and gait of the German Shepherd Dog, according to its function as a working dog, and compared to the anatomy and movement of the grey wolf. If you love this breed, you will love this book.
For more images of the book and its contents, click on the Page, Illustrated Standard.

HOW TO ORDER YOUR COPY.
Don’t forget to include your mailing address.
For US orders, the books are delivered via courier to the United State Postal Service and shipped Priority Post. It is fast, reliable and reasonably priced.
For purchases within Canada, please contact me at standard@shawlein.com. HST will apply.



Click above for purchases in the United States: US $55.00. This includes shipping.



Click above for International purchases: US $60.00. This includes shipping.

SHAW GSD COVER

2016/01/14
by Linda J Shaw
Comments Off on The Illustrated Standard, a Review

The Illustrated Standard, a Review

Just some of the wonderful feedback The Illustrated Standard for the German Shepherd Dog has been receiving:

“I just received Linda Shaw’s incredible book today. If I could afford it I would buy one for every GSD person I know, and for sure every puppy owner. If you consider yourself a “Shepherdist” you should have one. It is so well written and well edited – succinct, informative, and free of politics. It will piss some extreme show people off, but I say let them write their own book and illustrate with such clarity why they say their dogs need to look like that in order to be useful or beautiful. The illustrations, the quality, the information presented in such a clear and concise way are well worth the price. I do hope it comes out in hard back one day, as it’s an heirloom quality volume. History making. Great job!”

Julia Priest
Coach for Canines

The Illustrated Standard for the German Shepherd Dog
The most comprehensive, heavily illustrated breed book ever published. It is a detailed anatomical analysis of the structure and gait of the German Shepherd Dog, according to its function as a working dog, and compared to the anatomy and movement of the grey wolf. If you love this breed, you will love this book.
For more images of the book and its contents, click on the Page, Illustrated Standard.

HOW TO ORDER YOUR COPY.
Don’t forget to include your mailing address.
For US orders, the books are delivered via courier to the United State Postal Service and shipped Priority Post. It is fast, reliable and reasonably priced.
For purchases within Canada, please contact me at standard@shawlein.com. HST will apply.



Click above for purchases in the United States: US $55.00. This includes shipping.



Click above for International purchases: US $60.00. This includes shipping.

SHAW GSD COVER

2015/11/11
by Linda J Shaw
Comments Off on The Illustrated Standard has Arrived!

The Illustrated Standard has Arrived!

My Illustrated Standard for the German Shepherd Dog has arrived, fresh from the printer! It is more beautiful than I hoped to imagine! I opted for a heavier cover stock with lamination and 80lb satin coated paper, and the result is sturdy and elegant. It is quality through and through. The drawings have reproduced beautifully, and the colour illustrations are fully saturated. I am thrilled. So will you be. Head over to THE ILLUSTRATED STANDARD page, listed above, for more pictures of the book and some of the drawings.

 

2015/10/26
by Linda J Shaw
Comments Off on The Illustrated Standard for the German Shepherd Dog

The Illustrated Standard for the German Shepherd Dog

Well, after two months of proofs, proof-reading, tweaking and editing, and much help from my wonderful designer Heather, the manuscript is heading to its final print run tomorrow. I decided to go with Maracle Press in Oshawa, Ontario, on the recommendation of a friend in the graphic arts business. They do absolutely beautiful work, and the proof I vetted today is gorgeous.  It won’t be long now!

2015/08/17
by Linda J Shaw
Comments Off on NEW BOOK COMING

NEW BOOK COMING

Well, after many years of thinking, planning, researching, discussing and, yes, procrastinating, my book, The Illustrated Standard for the German Shepherd Dog, is done. Almost. The manuscript is done – all 187 pages. Over 450 of my drawings have been completed. Over 90 photographs of really good dogs have been assembled. The design and layout has been completed by my design whiz schutzhund friend, Heather Dickinson. The cover art, again thanks to Heather, is done. SHAW GSD COVER

It has been through several edits. I always find something to tweak. It has one more edit before I am completely happy. The file is now out for print quotes. Hopefully I will have a retail price in the next few weeks. Once that is done, it will be available for order prior to printing.

I have put just about everything I know about the structure and movement of the GSD into this book. It is unlike any book ever published on the breed.

I go into considerable detail on rear angulation; what’s normal and what’s not, and why.

I go into considerable detail on back structure, and why the roach is not normal, based on published scientific research.

I go into considerable detail on the normal anatomy of both skeleton and musculature.

I have produced a frame by frame full stride analysis of the gait of one of the breed’s best movers, compared and contrasted to a frame by frame full stride analysis of the gait of a wild grey wolf. The results are startling.

I have a detailed section on the genetics of color and pigmentation, with full colour illustrations of almost every colour variation in the breed, as well as a full colour section of illustrations of the internal anatomy.

I could go on and on, but you should read the book. I will be updating its progress through the publishing process here.

One thing that this book is not, is like any other book currently available on the breed.

L Shaw
standard@shawlein.com

 

All content copy-righted Linda J Shaw 2000 - 2014.

Use of any material strictly prohibited without written permission of the author, Linda J Shaw.

   

Proudly powered by WordPress | Theme: Yoko by Elmastudio

Top